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Getting Things Done: The Science behind Stress-Free Productivity

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Posted by JBfrom
Nov 20, 2011 at 04:07 PM

 

http://cogprints.org/6289/

Getting Things Done: The Science behind Stress-Free Productivity
Heylighen, Francis and Vidal, Cl?ment (2007) Getting Things Done: The Science behind Stress-Free Productivity. [Journal (On-line/Unpaginated)]

Allen (2001) proposed the ?Getting Things Done? (GTD) method for personal productivity enhancement, and reduction of the stress caused by information overload. This paper argues that recent insights in psychology and cognitive science support and extend GTD?s recommendations. We first summarize GTD with the help of a flowchart. We then review the theories of situated, embodied and distributed cognition that purport to explain how the brain processes information and plans actions in the real world. The conclusion is that the brain heavily relies on the environment, to function as an external memory, a trigger for actions, and a source of affordances, disturbances and feedback. We then show how these principles are practically implemented in GTD, with its focus on organizing tasks into ?actionable? external memories, and on opportunistic, situation-dependent execution. Finally, we propose an extension of GTD to support collaborative work, inspired by the concept of stigmergy.

 


Posted by Daly de Gagne
Nov 20, 2011 at 08:36 PM

 

The article abstract makes some good points, ones which I believe are justified based on my limited knowledge and experience. The full article is available free as a PDF, which I have downloaded and quickly perused. I think the article will go a long way in responding to categorical assertions which time to time are made with regard to presumed limitations of David Allen’s GTD process. In fact, the article illumines some the inherent strengths of Allen’s GTD.

Daly

JBfrom wrote:
>http://cogprints.org/6289/
> >Getting Things Done: The Science behind
>Stress-Free Productivity
>Heylighen, Francis and Vidal, Cl?ment (2007) Getting
>Things Done: The Science behind Stress-Free Productivity. [Journal
>(On-line/Unpaginated)]
> >Allen (2001) proposed the ?Getting Things Done? (GTD)
>method for personal productivity enhancement, and reduction of the stress caused by
>information overload. This paper argues that recent insights in psychology and
>cognitive science support and extend GTD?s recommendations. We first summarize GTD
>with the help of a flowchart. We then review the theories of situated, embodied and
>distributed cognition that purport to explain how the brain processes information
>and plans actions in the real world. The conclusion is that the brain heavily relies on
>the environment, to function as an external memory, a trigger for actions, and a
>source of affordances, disturbances and feedback. We then show how these principles
>are practically implemented in GTD, with its focus on organizing tasks into
>?actionable? external memories, and on opportunistic, situation-dependent
>execution. Finally, we propose an extension of GTD to support collaborative work,
>inspired by the concept of stigmergy. 

 


Posted by Daly de Gagne
Nov 20, 2011 at 09:35 PM

 

FYI, I have posted about the article to my blog http://www.exuberanteclectic.com/2011/11/science-of-getting-things-done-allens.html

Thanks, JB, for bringing the article to the forum!

Daly

 


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